John McCain diagnosed with Brain Cancer,

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) has been diagnosed with brain cancer, the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix said Wednesday. The tumor was discovered after the senior Arizona senator underwent a minor procedure last week to remove a blood clot from above his left eye.

“Subsequent tissue pathology revealed that a primary brain tumor known as a glioblastoma was associated with the blood clot,” the hospital said in a statement.

The 80-year-old McCain, R-Ariz., is reviewing treatment options with his family that could include a combination of chemotherapy and radiation, according to the statement.

McCain’s latest diagnosis is not his first battle with cancer. He underwent a procedure in 2000 to remove a type of skin cancer called melanoma from the left side of his face.

McCain’s office said in a statement that the Arizona Republican remained in good spirits Wednesday and is confident that any treatments will be effective.




“He is in good spirits as he continues to recover at home with his family in Arizona,” his office said.

“He is grateful to the doctors and staff at Mayo Clinic for their outstanding care, and is confident that any future treatment will be effective.”

His office said further consultations with his doctors will determine when he will return to the Senate.

The news of McCain’s diagnosis prompted an immediate outpouring of support from fellow lawmakers.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kent.) characterized McCain as a fighter, saying in a statement that “he will face this challenge with the same extraordinary courage that has characterized his life.”

“John McCain is a hero to our Conference and a hero to our country. He has never shied away from a fight and I know he will face this challenge with the same extraordinary courage that has characterized his life,” McConnell said in a statement. “The entire Senate family’s prayers are with John, Cindy and his family, his staff, and the people of Arizona he represents so well.”

Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas), the No. 2 Senate Republican, echoed McConnell’s characterization of McCain and said the diagnosis was “just the latest challenge” for Arizona Republican.