States Move To Tighten Medicaid Enrollment


GOP lawmakers have proposed winding down the Medicaid expansion that added 17 million people in 31 states and the District of Columbia under Obamacare. The Medicaid program was designed to help underprivileged citizens and was the cornerstone of President Obama’s effort to supply Medical insurance to all citizens. Democrats again created an entitlement that creates dependents instead of productive working citizens.




Some 74.5 million people are now enrolled in Medicaid — more than the 58 million covered by Medicare, the program for seniors and the disabled. Since the implementation of the Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act in 2014, Medicaid enrollment has grown by 16.7 million. That increase alone is larger than the number of people who purchase health insurance through the marketplaces set up by the ACA.

In many ways, the current battles pit those who view Medicaid as a health insurance program, in which higher enrollment is not seen as a problem, against those who see it as a welfare program, in which lower enrollment is prized.

If the current bill in the Senate becomes law, 15 million fewer people would have coverage through Medicaid by 2026, the Congressional Budget Office has predicted.

But other efforts that are garnering much less attention would further reshape Medicaid, potentially knocking millions more off the rolls that should never have never been added in the first place. They include asking beneficiaries to verify their eligibility twice a year, instead of once under the current law.

In many ways, the current battles pit those who view Medicaid as a health insurance program, in which higher enrollment is not seen as a problem, against those who see it as a welfare program, in which lower enrollment is prized.